Acadia University Online Course Catalog

2017 - 2018

Philosophy

Department School Year

* Students may register for no more than 6 hours at the 1000-level: Phil 1106 (6h) or Phil 1113, 1213, 1223, 1413, 1423 (3hrs).
* Major credit is also given for Pols 2346, 2643.


Course Title Offered in 2017
F/W INT COR Last Offered
PHIL 1106 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY       2012-F/W
An introduction which focuses on philosophy as a rigorous problem- solving discipline. After asking about the nature of philosophy itself, we will tackle philosophical problems concerning language, logic, identity, knowledge, morality, and God. We will work throughout to master the logical skills necessary not only for good philosophizing but for clear thinking on any topic. Students may register for no more than 6 hours at the 1000-level.
PHIL 1113 EXAMINED LIFE IN THE INFORMATION AGE Yes     2017-F/W
This course offers an exploration of major philosophical themes in the context of the emerging technological and information revolution. We will explore subjects that include: 1) challenges to autonomy in an age of mass culture, 2) the effects of integrated media, 3) the philosophical shift from citizen to consumer, and 4) the moral implications of the uses and abuses of technology. Students may register for no more than 6 hours at the 1000-level.
PHIL 1413 GOD, ETHICS & JUSTICE Yes     2017-F/W
In this course, the student is introduced to philosophy through a series of shorter philosophical excerpts from a variety of authors and periods. The focus will be on three issues: whether a divine being exists, how to understand the nature of ethical standards, and what constitutes political justice. The goal throughout is to develop skills of critical analysis and self-expression, while coming to understand some of our culture's most influential thinkers. Students may register for no more than 6 hours at the 1000-level.
PHIL 1423 FREEDOM, MIND & KNOWLEDGE Yes     2017-F/W
In this course, the student is introduced to philosophy through a series of shorter philosophical excerpts from a variety of authors and periods. The focus will be on three issues: whether humans genuinely exercise free choice, how to understand the relation between body and mind, and what constitutes human knowledge. The goal throughout is to develop skills of critical analysis and self-expression, while coming to understand some of our culture's most influential thinkers. Students may register for no more than 6 hours at the 1000-level.
PHIL 2006 ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY       2016-F/W
The conception of the human soul in Plato and Aristotle. Consideration may also be given to thinkers such as Heraclitus, Parmenides, Epictetus, Sextus Empiricus, and Plotinus. The forms of human knowledge, the human political condition and the ultimate nature of reality will also be topics of study.
PHIL 2016 EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY Yes     2017-F/W
The course begins with an overview of the scientific revolution and procedes to a comparison of the reactions of the Continental Rationalists and the British Empiricists to the new science. Authors to be studied include: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. The course concludes with an introduction to the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, whose work is the culmination of early modern philosophy.
PHIL 2023 19TH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY Yes     2017-F/W
Post-Kantian European philosophy, with emphasis on Hegel. Topics considered include self-consciousness, human freedom and political order, the grounds of knowledge, the nature of religion, and the possibility of a systematic science of philosophy. Other figures studied may include Fichte, Schelling, Schopenhauer, Marx, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard.
PHIL 2103 AESTHETICS Yes     2017-F/W
In this introduction to aesthetics a number of philosophically important questions provoked by art will be addressed. The course will cover both classical and contemporary responses to these questions, and will focus on such issues as the definition of "art", the objectivity of claims about beauty and artistic worth, and the nature of the creative process.
PHIL 2223 EXISTENTIALISM Yes     2017-F/W
The Existentialist 'revolt' in philosophy was an attempt to focus attention upon the implications of modern Western society for the individual who must live in that society. The origins of this movement, as well as its influence in theology, psychology, and the arts, will be examined.
PHIL 2233 PHILOSOPHY & FEMINISM Yes     2017-F/W
Feminist philosophy became a major voice in the twentieth-century, challenging many traditional views in areas as diverse as politics, ethics, aesthetics, and the theory of knowledge. Drawing primarily on writings by women, the major developments of feminist thought will be studied. The relation of feminism to other contemporary philosophical movements such as Marxism, Pragmatism, Existentialism, and Post-Modernism will also be considered.
PHIL 2303 PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT Yes     2017-F/W
This course addresses conceptions of the relationship between humans and nature. The course will foster an analytic approach to environmental issues while recognizing the broad range of social, scientific, and philosophical themes involved. The aim will be to develop a clear and comprehensive understanding of environmental issues, an understanding which can serve as the basis for ethical and critical evaluation of the consequences of human actions for the environment.
PHIL 2306 ETHICS       2016-F/W
This course is a critical study of the nature and justification of ethical judgements, with an analysis of key concepts such as contract, justice, responsibility, welfare, rights, duty, and virtue. We will examine selected readings by ancient, early modern and contemporary thinkers.
PHIL 2403 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION       2016-F/W
This course addresses philosophical issues raised by traditional belief in God. Why care whether God exists? Why care whether belief in God is rational? Does the rationality of belief in God depend on the evidence for, and against, God's existence? What is the best evidence for and against? What bearing does God have on human morality? Prereq: One year of university study
PHIL 2503 MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY       -
A study of theoretical problems posed by the conjunction of revealed religion and philosophy from the third century C.E. to the Renaissance. The ideas of the central figures will be examined through selections of original sources and discussions of themes (e.g. knowledge of God, theory of knowing, theory of being).
PHIL 2523 PROB IN PHIL SOC SCIENCE       1987-F/W
 
PHIL 2713 BIOMEDICAL ETHICS Yes     2017-F/W
Recent advances in medicine and the biological sciences raise pressing moral and legal questions as to their proper use and control. Experimentation on human subjects, organ transplants, genetic control, behaviour modification, active and passive euthanasia, and the question of priorities in health care, against the background of both natural rights and utilitarian considerations. Prereq: One year of university study
PHIL 2723 PHILOSOPHY AND CULTURE       2007-INT
An examination from the focus of social philosophy of the problem of the cultural and repression of human sexuality and aggression. Partly in seminar form, works by Wilhelm Reich, Norman O. Brown and Marcuse are given critical review.
PHIL 2803 METAPHYSICS Yes     2017-F/W
We will explore such metaphysical issues as the following: What is causation? Are there non-existent things? Can there be ordinary physical objects in spite of their vagueness? Can distinct physical things coincide in space and time? Are there possible worlds besides the actual world? Is time-travel possible? Is the passing of time an illusion? Prereq: one year of university study
PHIL 2813 LOGIC 1 Yes     2017-F/W
Introduction to logic with emphasis upon the analysis and evaluation of non-deductive reasoning. No previous philosophy courses required.
PHIL 2823 LOGIC 2 Yes     2017-F/W
Introduction to symbolic logic. Symbolism is developed for the analysis and evaluation of arguments. No previous philosophy courses required.
PHIL 2913 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE Yes     2017-F/W
An introduction to the philosophical foundations of scientific theories. Topics to be discussed include the interpretation and confirmation of scientific theories, reduction, and scientific explanation, causation and laws. The course raises conceptual issues which fall between science and philosophy, as well as broader epistemological issues concerning theory change and the concept of progress in science.
PHIL 3013 EXISTENTIALISM & LITERATURE       1994-F/W
A study of the idea of human existence in philosophers such as Sartre, Heidegger, de Beauvoir, Merleau-Ponty, Cixous, and Derrida, with the primary focus on the place of expression within the context of human freedom. This foundation will be used to study the nature of literature in general while using literary works to develop these views. Selections might be drawn from Homer, Joyce, Garcia Marquez, Kafka, Camus, Wittig, Nin, de Sade, Kinsella.
PHIL 3113 KANT: CRITIQUE PURE REASON       2014-F/W
Students will be introduced to the foundations of Kant's critical philosophy through close examination of selected passages in the first Critique. An introduction to topics in the secondary literature on Kant may also be provided. Prereq: two previous half-courses in Phil or permission of dept
PHIL 3123 PROBS IN PHIL OF NATURAL SCI       1981-F/W
The basic concepts of science and its presuppositions and the structure of scientific explanation, the nature of laws, models and scientific theory are examined.
PHIL 3203 JUSTICE & LAW: RIGHTS, LAWS & JUDGES Yes     2017-F/W
This course explores the question of constitutional rights. What rights should our constitution provide? Can constitutional provisions be given a strict legal interpretation, or does constitutional interpretation require judges to apply their own moral beliefs? Should unelected judges have the authority to strike down legislation just because, in their view, it violates rights such as freedom of expression and equality? Prereq: One year of university study
PHIL 3213 JUSTICE & LAW: PRIVATE LAW Yes     2017-F/W
This course is a philosophical treatment of issues in the private law of tort and contract. Tort law is concerned with personal injury. Is fault the right way of looking at this issue? Perhaps a robust form of social insurance provides a better approach to injuries. Moreover, what contracts as fair? When should contacts be reversed by the courts? Prereq: One year of university study
PHIL 3223 KANTIAN PRACTICAL REASON       2016-F/W
Kant aims to reveal that the demands of morality apply equally to all, irrespective of empirical considerations such as race, ethnicity, culture and religion, among others. In an age of moral fragmentation, the Kantian model offers the optimistic promise of a shared moral community, with reciprocal moral rights and obligations.
PHIL 3313 PHILOSOPHY OF MIND Yes     2017-F/W
An examination of some contemporary accounts of the nature of mind and its relation to the body. Topics to be covered will include mind-body identity theory, logical behaviourism, functionalism, and the idea of personal identity.
PHIL 3513 PLATO       2005-F/W
An introduction to the philosophy of Plato is provided through a detailed study of selected dialogues.
PHIL 3533 ARISTOTLE       2005-F/W
An introduction to the philosophy of Aristotle with an emphasis on his metaphysical, ethical and epistemological writings.
PHIL 3553 CONTEMPORARY ANALYTIC PHIL       2015-F/W
A survey of the major landmarks in the development of contemporary analytic metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language, and a critical examination of some central issues. Prereq: Phil 1106, 1206 or 1406 or permission of dept
PHIL 3613 CONTEMPORARY CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY       2001-F/W
A study of the work of three or four European thinkers such as Heidegger, Foucault, Derrida, Wittig, Habermas, Cixous, Gadamer, Deleuze, Benjamin and Adorno considering such issues as the nature of power in society, the relation between art and politics, hermeneutics and deconstruction, gender and self-identity, alienation and human freedom, and feminist politics.
PHIL 3903 EPISTEMOLOGY       2014-F/W
A systematic examination of central topics in contemporary theory of knowledge: What is it to know anything? What kinds of knowledge are there? What are the sources of knowledge? Are there limits to what can be known? Does knowledge require foundations? Under what conditions are we entitled to advance knowledge-claims? What is the relation between knowing, believing and having reasons for belief?
PHIL 4113 TOPICS:SOCIAL & POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY Yes     2017-F/W
This course examines selected concepts, themes, or traditions within the field of social and political philosophy. Specific course content in any given year will be available from the Philosophy department.
PHIL 4853 PHILOSOPHICAL TOPICS Yes     2017-F/W
An opportunity to do advanced study of a particular philosophical issue, thinker or period. The content will vary yearly.
PHIL 4913 DIRECTED READINGS 1 Yes     2017-F/W
 
PHIL 4923 DIRECTED READINGS 2       2015-F/W
 
PHIL 4996 HONOURS THESIS Yes     2017-F/W
 

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